Turkey Stall ????

We love to cook and we love to hear what others are cooking. With pics of course!
Post Reply
ACC
Wants More tools
Wants More tools
Posts: 110
Joined: February 22nd, 2016, 8:57 am

Turkey Stall ????

Post by ACC » February 20th, 2018, 10:41 am

:headwall: :headwall:
Is there a stall on turkeys like there is on briskets? I smoked 3 spatchcocked 11 lbs. turkeys yesterday at 240 degrees. Internal temperature, monitored in a breast, rose steadily during the first 3 hours. Once the temperature reached 154 F it shut down. It took an hour to reach 158 and another 45 minutes to reach 160. Since the rise was so slow, I was afraid that there would be no or very little carryover cooking. After resting for > an hour, the meat deep inside the breast was fine but the meat near the outside was overcooked. The breast were in the smoker for 5 hours. Since they were spatchcocked, I had expect about 3 hours cook time.

Anyone else ever experience a stall on their turkey?

Anybody have suggestions on how I can avoid drying out the outside of the breast?

Perhaps the way I prepared the birds for cooking contributed to the dry flesh and the stall. I trimmed off the extra neck skin. Then I punctured the flesh with a tenderizing device made up of multiple needles. On one bird, I filled the pocket with herb butter. On the other bird, I used Cajun marinade. The thought was that the melted butter and marinade would ooze into the puncture holes and make the breast nice and juicy. It did not work.

During cooking, the skin pulled back some and exposed the top end of the breast directly to the heat. This area of the breast was the driest. The lower end of the breast, which was well covered by the skin and was not punctured, was rather moist. I wonder if the punctures allowed moisture to escape from the flesh, drying it out and causing evaporative cooling. This could have caused the stall.

What do you think?



User avatar
AndrewPalmer71
SmokerBuilder Addict
SmokerBuilder Addict
Posts: 161
Joined: December 29th, 2016, 2:54 am
Title: SmokinAddict
BBQ Comp Team Name: Not competing yet...

Re: Turkey Stall ????

Post by AndrewPalmer71 » February 20th, 2018, 11:10 am

I've always had luck cooking my turkeys at high heat, above 270 degrees. I have not had much luck with low and slow on turkeys as the breast tends to dry out and become rubbery.

Sent from my SM-J727V using Tapatalk



User avatar
Dirtytires
Expert
Expert
Posts: 2223
Joined: November 24th, 2015, 12:36 am
Title: It ain't broke...yet
BBQ Comp Team Name: Dont compete...cook for events once in a while
Location: Phoenix, Az

Re: Turkey Stall ????

Post by Dirtytires » February 20th, 2018, 11:27 am

The stall takes place at the point in a cook where the fat starts to render and pulls the heat with it. A turkey is a pretty lean meat so I would not expect, and have personally,not experienced one.

Turkey is super easy. Spatchcock it, quick rub with olive oil then a little pepper and herbs. That’s it. Don’t cut off the skin or punch holes in the meat. Butter is really not going to go anywhere useful.

I don’t infect mine and have never been disappointed. At Christmas, it was so juicy and tender my mother in law commented it was the best “chicken” she had ever had (and I chuckled as I told her it was turkey).

Your cook time sounds a bit long but all meat is different. My 20-22 lb birds constistantly take 5 hours at 225-235 so you might be a bit long. Make sure you use a good instant thermometer and get it off as soon at it hits temp. I also don’t rest my poultry...cut it and eat it immediately or it’ll be over cooked.

And lastly, I know everyone wants to see the big turkey on the smoker but every time you open the lid to look or check the temp, you add cooking time. If you don’t have a remote probe thermometer, get one and you will never need to open your smoker during a cook again..



ACC
Wants More tools
Wants More tools
Posts: 110
Joined: February 22nd, 2016, 8:57 am

Re: Turkey Stall ????

Post by ACC » February 20th, 2018, 1:04 pm

Thanks for the feedback. I am definitely not going to punch holes in one again. It did not enhance the meat and may have pushed surface bacteria into the meat where they are harder to kill. Also, the holes may have provided an avenue for moisture to escape. I think next time I'll try 270 degrees. Hopefully, the higher heat will prevent a stall situation.

"Super easy". :chef: That's what I thought after my first turkey cook. It was a Honesuckle breast. Just use oil, salt and pepper. It was WONDERFUL --juicy and smoky. Although, the skin was not crispy. Unfortunately, I did not keep notes on that cook. The next 2 cooks were not so good. On the second cook I tried to crisp up the skin. It was a whole bird cooked at 325-350 until breast was 165 degrees (20lbs for 4 hrs). Carryover heating took it to at least 169. It was over cooked. Had some creosoting going on too. At that temperature, it did not have a stall. Went from 157 to 165 in 20 minutes. The second cook was yesterdays which I described in the original post. It was the product of reading many recipes on-line. But I must confess the hole punching was a last minute idea of mine. I can't blame that on anyone but me. The fancy complicated approach did not work out very well. I'm going back to a simple and easy approach --10 lb bird, spatchcocked, oil, salt, pepper, neck skin on and cook at 270-275.

I think I'll pull the next one from the pit at 160 degrees or lower. Most websites recommend 160 relying on carryover heating to reach 165. One website recommended 155 degrees. I'm a bit nervous about that. I don't want to make anyone sick. At what temperture do you guys pull the breast off the pit? How about the thighs?

I avoided the creosoting by being more selective on my wood and only adding a small amount at a time so that there would be a more complete burn in the firebox. I also knocked off most of the bark and preheated the wood. The previous creosoting occured when I added new wood and there was a dirty burn for a few minutes.



User avatar
AndrewPalmer71
SmokerBuilder Addict
SmokerBuilder Addict
Posts: 161
Joined: December 29th, 2016, 2:54 am
Title: SmokinAddict
BBQ Comp Team Name: Not competing yet...

Re: RE: Re: Turkey Stall ????

Post by AndrewPalmer71 » February 20th, 2018, 3:15 pm

ACC wrote:Thanks for the feedback. I am definitely not going to punch holes in one again. It did not enhance the meat and may have pushed surface bacteria into the meat where they are harder to kill. Also, the holes may have provided an avenue for moisture to escape. I think next time I'll try 270 degrees. Hopefully, the higher heat will prevent a stall situation.

"Super easy". :chef: That's what I thought after my first turkey cook. It was a Honesuckle breast. Just use oil, salt and pepper. It was WONDERFUL --juicy and smoky. Although, the skin was not crispy. Unfortunately, I did not keep notes on that cook. The next 2 cooks were not so good. On the second cook I tried to crisp up the skin. It was a whole bird cooked at 325-350 until breast was 165 degrees (20lbs for 4 hrs). Carryover heating took it to at least 169. It was over cooked. Had some creosoting going on too. At that temperature, it did not have a stall. Went from 157 to 165 in 20 minutes. The second cook was yesterdays which I described in the original post. It was the product of reading many recipes on-line. But I must confess the hole punching was a last minute idea of mine. I can't blame that on anyone but me. The fancy complicated approach did not work out very well. I'm going back to a simple and easy approach --10 lb bird, spatchcocked, oil, salt, pepper, neck skin on and cook at 270-275.

I think I'll pull the next one from the pit at 160 degrees or lower. Most websites recommend 160 relying on carryover heating to reach 165. One website recommended 155 degrees. I'm a bit nervous about that. I don't want to make anyone sick. At what temperture do you guys pull the breast off the pit? How about the thighs?

I avoided the creosoting by being more selective on my wood and only adding a small amount at a time so that there would be a more complete burn in the firebox. I also knocked off most of the bark and preheated the wood. The previous creosoting occured when I added new wood and there was a dirty burn for a few minutes.
I pull at 160, wrap the bird in heavy aluminum foil and let it rest to allow for carryover heating to above 165.

Sent from my SM-J727V using Tapatalk



User avatar
Dirtytires
Expert
Expert
Posts: 2223
Joined: November 24th, 2015, 12:36 am
Title: It ain't broke...yet
BBQ Comp Team Name: Dont compete...cook for events once in a while
Location: Phoenix, Az

Re: Turkey Stall ????

Post by Dirtytires » February 20th, 2018, 4:36 pm

I pull at 165 and carve immediately..no wrap and no rest. I’d be careful of cooking at 270-300 as that seems a bit high. At that point, put it on the bbq rotisserie.

Experimenting will prove what works best for you tho.



Post Reply

Return to “FOOD!”